Eco-Friendly Seafood Choices vs. Eco-Poor Seafood Choices

Part of being a foodie involves making informed decisions on your eating habits, whether for taste, health, or even political motives. When considering seafood, you might want to take into account which fish work best with a “save-theplanet” mentality.

There are several reasons why this should be on one’s buying radar: Failing Fisheries, Pollutions, over-fishing, the list is long. Below I’ve re-posted the EnvironmentalDefence.org’s handy-dandy reference list of good vs. bad seafood. Use it wisely.

Good:

  • Abalone – U.S. farmed
  • Anchovies
  • Arctic char – U.S. and Canadian farmed
  • Catfish – U.S. farmed
  • Caviar – farmed paddlefish and sturgeon eggs
  • Clams – butter, geoducks, hard, littlenecks, Manila
  • Crab – Dungeness, snow from Canada, stone
  • Crawfish – U.S.
  • Halibut – from Alaska
  • Herring – Atlantic sea herring
  • Mackerel – Atlantic, Spanish
  • Mahimahi/dolphinfish – U.S., from the Atlantic
  • Mussels – farmed blue, New Zealand green
  • Oysters – farmed Eastern, European, Pacific
  • Sablefish/black cod – from Alaska
  • Salmon – wild from Alaska: chinook, chum, coho, pink, sockeye
  • Sardines
  • Scallops – farmed bay
  • Shrimp – Northern from Newfoundland, U.S. farmed
  • Spot prawns
  • Striped bass/Atlantic rockfish – farmed and wild
  • Sturgeon – farmed
  • Tilapia – U.S.

Bad:

  • Caviar - wild sturgeon and paddlefish eggs
  • Chilean seabass/toothfish
  • Cod - Atlantic
  • Grouper
  • Halibut – Atlantic
  • Marlin
  • Monkfish/goosefish
  • Orange roughy
  • Rockfish – Pacific (rock cod/boccacio)
  • Salmon – farmed or Atlantic
  • Shark
  • Shrimp/prawns – imported
  • Skate
  • Snapper
  • Sturgeon – wild
  • Swordfish
  • Tilefish
  • Tuna – bluefin


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