Tag Archives: Sustainable Foods

Is Vanilla on the Extinction List?

Tana, a frequent visitor to this blog, has her own very fabulous site full of information about local and small farms. It’s one of many sites I try to visit on a regular basis.

Last week, she had one of the better food posts I’ve recently read. Patricia Rain, the Vanilla Queen, passed along some information for Tana to post that I feel that most foodies should read. Especially those of you into desserts and sweets.

The post entitled Saving Pure Vanilla is much worth the time.

And many thanks to Tana and Patricia, for making this issue better known.


More Seafood choices

I thought I’d bring this up as several people have mentioned it to me in both the comments and E-mail.

Aside from the Environmental Defence‘s list of proper seafood choices, there’s another list out there that one should be aware.

Monterey Bay Aquarium‘s Seafood Watch holds an annual conference to determine seafood choices, and compiles the list into 3 categories: Best Choices, Good Alternatives and Avoid. Please check out the list on the link prior, or download a card for you to carry (.pdf format).

As others have mentioned, it’s a bit more nuanced than the Environmental Defence’s, and both lists do not contradict one another. Between the two of them, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be making informed seafood choices.


Eco-Friendly Seafood Choices vs. Eco-Poor Seafood Choices version 2

Back last December, I posted about the Environmental Defense’s list of good fish choices, vs. bad fish choices.

I received a nice e-mail from Leslie Valentine from Environment Defense, letting me know that the list has been updated. I’ll give the list below, but I invite you to take a look at their new site Oceans Alive to get the full picture on why one should be aware of the seafood choices that we make.

Good:

  • Abalone – U.S. farmed
  • Anchovies
  • Arctic char – U.S. and Canadian farmed
  • Catfish – U.S. farmed
  • Caviar – farmed paddlefish and sturgeon eggs
  • Clams – butter, geoducks, hard, littlenecks, Manila
  • Crab – Dungeness, snow from Canada, stone
  • Crawfish – U.S.
  • Halibut – from Alaska
  • Herring – Atlantic sea herring
  • Mackerel – Atlantic, Spanish
  • Mahimahi/dolphinfish – U.S., from the Atlantic
  • Mussels – farmed blue, New Zealand green
  • Oysters – farmed Eastern, European, Pacific
  • Sablefish/black cod – from Alaska
  • Salmon – wild from Alaska: chinook, chum, coho, pink, sockeye
  • Sardines
  • Scallops – farmed bay
  • Shrimp – Northern from Newfoundland, U.S. farmed
  • Spot prawns
  • Striped bass/Atlantic rockfish – farmed and wild
  • Sturgeon – farmed
  • Tilapia – U.S

Bad

  • Caviar – wild sturgeon and paddlefish eggs
  • Chilean seabass/toothfish
  • Cod – Atlantic
  • Grouper
  • Halibut – Atlantic
  • Marlin
  • Monkfish/goosefish
  • Orange roughy
  • Rockfish – Pacific (rock cod/boccacio)
  • Salmon – farmed or Atlantic
  • Shark
  • Shrimp/prawns – imported
  • Skate
  • Snapper
  • Sturgeon – wild
  • Swordfish – imported
  • Tilefish
  • Tuna – bluefin


Eco-Friendly Seafood Choices vs. Eco-Poor Seafood Choices

Part of being a foodie involves making informed decisions on your eating habits, whether for taste, health, or even political motives. When considering seafood, you might want to take into account which fish work best with a “save-theplanet” mentality.

There are several reasons why this should be on one’s buying radar: Failing Fisheries, Pollutions, over-fishing, the list is long. Below I’ve re-posted the EnvironmentalDefence.org’s handy-dandy reference list of good vs. bad seafood. Use it wisely.

Good:

  • Abalone – U.S. farmed
  • Anchovies
  • Arctic char – U.S. and Canadian farmed
  • Catfish – U.S. farmed
  • Caviar – farmed paddlefish and sturgeon eggs
  • Clams – butter, geoducks, hard, littlenecks, Manila
  • Crab – Dungeness, snow from Canada, stone
  • Crawfish – U.S.
  • Halibut – from Alaska
  • Herring – Atlantic sea herring
  • Mackerel – Atlantic, Spanish
  • Mahimahi/dolphinfish – U.S., from the Atlantic
  • Mussels – farmed blue, New Zealand green
  • Oysters – farmed Eastern, European, Pacific
  • Sablefish/black cod – from Alaska
  • Salmon – wild from Alaska: chinook, chum, coho, pink, sockeye
  • Sardines
  • Scallops – farmed bay
  • Shrimp – Northern from Newfoundland, U.S. farmed
  • Spot prawns
  • Striped bass/Atlantic rockfish – farmed and wild
  • Sturgeon – farmed
  • Tilapia – U.S.

Bad:

  • Caviar - wild sturgeon and paddlefish eggs
  • Chilean seabass/toothfish
  • Cod - Atlantic
  • Grouper
  • Halibut – Atlantic
  • Marlin
  • Monkfish/goosefish
  • Orange roughy
  • Rockfish – Pacific (rock cod/boccacio)
  • Salmon – farmed or Atlantic
  • Shark
  • Shrimp/prawns – imported
  • Skate
  • Snapper
  • Sturgeon – wild
  • Swordfish
  • Tilefish
  • Tuna – bluefin