The Great Scottish Candy Haul

If there’s one aspect to non-chocolate candy that I adore, it’s how they look. From their colors to their shapes, they provide an aesthetic that chocolate simply can’t compete with. The first part of this trip has been only about these types of sweets. It’s easy to see why people are drawn to them.

Sugar Mice

Sugar Mice

Not much more than sugar shaped to look like a creature of some sort (you’ll often see sugar pigs as well). Some flavoring is added, but coloring is really where the difference is made.

Rose Bud

Rose Bud

A beautiful looking sweet, with a floral flavor, rather than one from a fruit or herb. These types of sweets are a almost a lost candy, as flowers used to flavor sweets (or their sibling, medicines) quite often way back when. Nowadays, we’ve dismissed flowers as a flavoring.

Marzipan

Marzipan

More pastry than sweet, I’ve added it here, mostly because I’m still up in the air on where to classify this treat. These follow the tradition of shaping a sweet to look like something else, much like the sugar mice above. Which came first is a matter of dispute.

Raspberry Sour Fizz

Raspberry Sour Fizz

Probably one of the more modern of the candies found on this post. Sour has always been as aspect of sweets, from Acid Drops to Soor Plums (mentioned below). Driving the ‘sour’ aspect into overdrive is a recent technique. The fizz aspect has an older tradition, what with the Brits fascination for sherbet. And by sherbet, I mean the powdered candy, rather than the iced treat we Americans associate with the term.

Jelly Babies

Jelly Babies

Honestly, I’ve only added this because I’m a fan of Doctor Who. These candies could be traced to the wine gums and other jellies.

Soor Plums

Soor Plooms

Soor Plooms, aka “Sour Plums” is Scottish in origin, although most dates given as to when this happened are based more in legend than in fact. What’s interesting to me is the term “plum”. We in America often interpret this as a literal meaning, when in fact, a plum in the United Kingdom used to be a synonym for a sweet. Sugar Plums and Sour Plums, are basically

Aniseed Balls

Aniseed Balls

A beautiful looking comfit, these used to be candies made with sugar panned repeatedly over Anise seeds. Nowadays, it’s likely the oil from anise seeds that is added.

Mint Humbugs

Mint Humbugs

A boiled sweet, a humbug is defined by its looks rather than its flavor. So there are licorice humbugs, toffee humbugs, and, as pictured above, mint.

Rock

Rock

In this instance, I’m referring to Rock in the British sense of the confectionery word. This means that it’s a hard stick-shaped sugar that has been boiled and then pulled, and then can be then or hammered into smaller pieces.

Hawick Balls

Hawick Balls
A toffee based boiled mint sweet from Scotland.

Berwick Cockles

Berwick Cockles

Another beautiful looking mint, this time shaped and colored in tune with the colors of Berwick-upon-Tweed, England, a town close to the Scottish border.

Edinburgh Rock

Edinburgh Rock

A variation of the ‘Rock’ candy mentioned above, but with more Tartaric Acid added to the mix, giving the candy a duller sheen, more chalk-like.